Craft fair fun!

Today I went to the Craft and Quilt Fair at the showgrounds. It was the first time I’d been, and it was much bigger than I expected!

craft fair

There was a huge hall full of stalls where different businesses and organisations were displaying and selling their wares. There were several rooms for different workshops that ran throughout each day, and there was another huge hall with an amazing display of quilts, and a selection of really rather good food stalls.

As I expected, most of the stalls were in the quilting and sewing vein. I don’t sew and I certainly can’t quilt, but for some reason I’m still attracted to piles of fat quarters and rolls of ribbon and rick-rack. I had a great time wandering around, looking at everything and wishing I was more creative! There were lots of different crafts represented there—sewing, knitting, crocheting, scrapbooking, cardmaking, and beading were just the start. It’s heartening to think we still have these skills, some of which were developed thousands of years ago. And it’s nice to see lots of young people learning and enjoying crafts too, although the dominant demographic was still the ‘older’ woman.

I did manage to come away with several strands of beads, some beautiful yarn, and a packet of lovely purple merino top (I have my first spinning lesson on Monday, yay!).

beads

yarn

Unfortunately there weren’t any workshops that appealed to me (but a veritable wealth for quilters!). However I was lucky enough to attend a brief talk entitled ‘Jane Austen’s women and their Regency crafts’. It was given by Jennifer Forest, who had researched the Regency era and recreated several Austen-inspired projects for her book Jane Austen’s Sewing Box. She read a few extracts from Austen’s novels, and explained and discussed some of the crafts mentioned. I finally know what ‘covering a screen’ and ‘netting a purse’ mean! (Aside: I just found an online magazine dedicated to Regency and Austen-inspired projects, see it here.) She had some original and recreated items to hand around too—such as a knotting shuttle, a thread case, and a gentleman’s cravat. It was a short talk but I wished she could have gone on for hours—I love Jane Austen’s novels, and it was so interesting to focus on the crafts of the era. Incidentally, it turns out that knitting was not something a lady did in public…hhmmm.

Well, I’ve never been that fussed about what ‘should’ and ‘shouldn’t’ be done!

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3 Responses to “Craft fair fun!”

  1. SP Says:

    Good luck with the spinning!

  2. Emma Says:

    That yellow yarn looks lovely. Looks like you did well, despite all the fabric and trimmings.

    bah to not knitting in public too, sometimes it’s the only way some projects get done!

  3. Spinning adventures « An odd assortment Says:

    […] of time in which to spin. But I did manage to finish off that glorious purple merino I got at the craft fair, and the last of the bond corriedale we used in […]

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